New Year Traditions Around The World

Our traditions are a reflection of our culture and social background.In different parts of the world festivals are celebrated in a different way. This implies a new year too as every part of the world has its own significant and beautiful way of welcoming the new year. A few things are never going to change with respect to the new year celebrations around the globe like- champagne, great company over good food, sometimes cutting of the new year cake. 

The tradition of exchanging new year gifts with our loved ones is still prevalent in almost every part of the world. Let’s have a look at the various rituals around the world in different countries with respect to new year celebrations. 

Haiti

Haitians consume pumpkin soup (soup joumou) because it was a treat that Black slaves were forbidden from eating. We frequently visit others’ homes to exchange some of our soup for some of theirs; everyone prepares soup slightly differently.

Spain

Twelve grapes are consumed to mark the beginning of the Spanish new year, one for each hour of the clock. La de las doce uvas de la suerte ritual, which dates back to the late 19th century, is said to ward against evil while increasing your chances of having a successful and fortunate new year. However, as you have to finish all of the grapes before the clock stops striking midnight, this will only work if you can do it quickly.

France

While the idea of drinking wine is about as unique in France as wearing flowers in the spring, the French boost the game and indulge in copious amounts of Champagne to ring in the new year. Party hopping and dancing are generally abundant, but this year’s events are probably going to be virtual. However, the menu options are the same: oysters, turkey, geese, or a Cornish hen are served with sparkling wines.

Denmark

Throwing dishes at your pals usually signifies a terrible conversation. However, in Denmark, customs like these on New Year’s Eve bring luck to your loved ones. According to this  tradition, you’ll be happier the more broken kitchenware you have on your doorstep.

Philippines

Families in the Philippines make sure to offer 12 round fruits on New Year’s Eve, such as apples, grapes, and plums, since they are said to symbolize prosperity because of their form, which resembles coins. Each fruit stands for a different month of the year in terms of the fortunate number.

Greece

Onions are not only a common vegetable in kitchens, but they may also be lucky for the next year. It’s customary in Greece to hang an onion outside your door. On New Year’s Day, the onion is hung on the door following church since it is said to represent fertility and growth.

Brazil 

Since it is summer in Brazil, people frequently visit the beaches. You’re meant to make seven wishes and jump seven waves at exactly midnight. You’re expected to dress entirely in white before entering the sea since it represents purity.

Japan

In Japan, a warm bowl of soba noodles is traditionally consumed to welcome the new year. The custom has its roots in the Buddhist monastery that distributed free noodles to the needy during the Kamakura era. Eating the long, thin noodles is thought to represent literally breaking away from the previous year since they are hard but simple to bite into.

Canada

Canadians continue to begin the new year with their preferred winter activity, ice fishing, despite the freezing temperatures. Renting heated shelters and cooking tools allows families to prepare their meal on-site and share it with loved ones.

Mexico

On New Year’s Eve, families cook traditional Mexican tamales, which are made of maize dough and are packed with meat, cheese, and vegetables before being wrapped in husks. The heated pockets are frequently served with menudo, a traditional Mexican soup prepared from a cow’s stomach, on New Year’s Day.

Colombia

Three potatoes—once peeled, one note, and the last one barely partially peeled—are traditionally placed beneath each member of the family’s bed on New Year’s Eve in Colombian families, according to the custom known as agüero. Each participant picks one at midnight while keeping their eyes closed, and depending on the potato they choose, they can either anticipate a year of good fortune, financial difficulty, or a combination of both. Find more gifts ideas here.

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